Where We're Going

Without a doubt, COVID has changed many things in society -- including the church. Before news of the Delta variant, when it seemed that the world might be returning to some kind of normal, our members met to talk about our dream for our church. We asked: Where is God calling us? How can we change to better meet people where they are? How can we best embrace our mission during these strange times?

Our conversation inspired our new logo. Check it out below, and see what it means to us -- and what we hope it can mean for you.

As a navigational tool, the compass provides direction to seekers and wayfarers, helping them to stay the course, avoid getting lost and explore uncharted territory. At Cedar Grove, we acknowledge that our world is changing, but we long to meet people where they are and help them grow in their relationship to God and others.

Perhaps it is not coincidence that a compass resembles a cross. To that end, we have adopted the compass rose as a symbol for our journey forward. By keeping the cross at our center as a reminder of God's grace, we are less likely to go astray. But should we wander off, the four action words of our mission statement call us back to our true purpose: "as disciples of Jesus Christ, we receive, embrace, grow and share."

If you'd like to journey with us, please contact our church office. New members are received through baptism, affirmation of faith or transfer from another congregation. We welcome all who desire to join our mission and our church family!

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What Our Colors Mean

Our color palette was inspired by one of our most important sacraments: baptism.

Mark 1:9-11 reads: "At that time Jesus came from Nazareth in Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. Just as Jesus was coming up out of the water, he saw heaven being torn open and the Spirit descending on him like a dove. And a voice came from heaven: 'You are my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased.'"

In God's three phrases, God is affirming who Jesus is through baptism, as first referenced in the Old Testament: 

  • "You are my Son" is from Psalm 2:7: "He said to me, 'You are my son; today I have become your father.'" - This is a powerful prophecy in which God makes a royal proclamation announcing His Son, the King of kings who would rule over the whole earth.

  • "[W]hom I love" is from Genesis 22:2: "Take your son, your only son, whom you love -- Isaac -- and go to the region of Moriah. Sacrifice him there..." In the parallel language used in the almost-sacrifice of Isaac by his father Abraham and here at Jesus's baptism, God seems to be saying, "Here is my precious son, my Isaac," hinting at the sacrifice God will soon ask of Jesus.

  • "[W]ith you I am well pleased" is from Isaiah 42:1: "'Here is my servant, whom I uphold, my chosen one in whom I delight; I will put my Spirit on him, and he will bring justice to the nations.'" This prophecy proclaims that God's Spirit is upon His servant, the Messiah. How fitting that the Father utters these words as the Spirit descends on Jesus in Jordan River. Despite being a king, God's Son is also a servant.

At his baptism, Jesus received his identity from God. He is beloved Son, King of kings, sacrifice and servant.

Our color choices affirm our belief in the importance of the sacrament of baptism and identity of Jesus, our Savior.

Baptism by water is a holy sacrament that we recognize as our re-birthday. In this new life, we are reborn children of God and inheritors of eternal life. Our faith family receives us as fellow members of the body of Christ, children of the same heavenly Father and co-workers in the kingdom of God. We claim the same blessings for the newly baptized. In these ways, baptism binds us to God and to others.

If you desire to be baptized, learn more about baptism or ask questions about faith matters, let us know. We'd love to talk with you!